Zak Brown Provides Update on Fresh F1 Concorde Agreement Talks

Discussions about the new Concorde Agreement are in early stages

As the new Concorde Agreement is set to come into force in 2026, McLaren CEO Zak Brown has revealed that discussions about the agreement are still in the very early stages.

The Concorde Agreement serves as the contract between the FIA, FOM, and F1 teams, outlining how the sport is governed and how television revenues and prize money are shared among the parties involved.

Renewing the Concorde Agreement can be a complex process, as each party has its own desires and priorities that may not always align with one another.

Zak Brown: Early Talks about New F1 Concorde Agreement Begin Despite being three years away, hints have already been dropped regarding the wishes of certain team principals, particularly regarding a potential increase in the current anti-dilution fund, which is currently set at $200 million.

In April, F1 President Stefano Domenicali expressed his hope for a swift negotiation process for the new agreement. Brown has now confirmed that the initial steps in the negotiation process have been taken.

“We’re starting to talk about starting to talk about it,” Brown told the media, including PlanetF1.com, ahead of the British Grand Prix. “So there are no significant conversations going on at the moment.

“From my perspective, I believe the sport is functioning well, so there’s a lot to discuss. I think we should continue as we are, with perhaps some refinements here and there. Ultimately, we are waiting for a formal approach to initiate the conversations.”

The possibility of an 11th team in Formula 1 was a recurring topic leading up to the Silverstone race, with Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff reiterating his opposition to the idea. Brown emphasized that the key aspect of any potential bid is what the prospective team can bring to the sport.

“There has been much debate about this, and everyone has an opinion. However, the decision ultimately rests with Formula 1 and the FIA,” stated Brown. “From my perspective, it would be easiest if they acquired one of the existing 10 teams, but the crucial factor is what they bring to the sport.

“What are they offering? What is the appropriate franchise fee? The sport has evolved significantly since we embarked on this journey five or six years ago. Let’s wait and see what happens.”

As discussions regarding the new Concorde Agreement progress, Formula 1 stakeholders will continue to evaluate the best path forward to ensure the sport’s success and sustainability in the years to come.